Rolling Stone's "500 Greatest Albums of All Time"

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  1. 1.
    Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
    by The Beatles

  2. 2.
    Pet Sounds
    by The Beach Boys

  3. 3.
    Revolver (Reis)
    by Beatles

  4. 4.
    Highway 61 Revisited (Hybr)
    by Bob Dylan

  5. 5.
    Rubber Soul (1990)
    by Beatles

  6. 6.
    What's Going On
    by Marvin Gaye

  7. 7.
    Exile on Main Street
    by Rolling Stones

  8. 8.
    London Calling
    by The Clash

  9. 9.
    Blonde on Blonde
    by Bob Dylan

  10. 10.
    The Beatles (The White Album)
    by Beatles

  11. 11.
    Sunrise
    by Elvis Presley

  12. 12.
    Kind of Blue
    by Miles Davis

  13. 13.
    The Velvet Underground & Nico
    by The Velvet Underground & Nico

  14. 14.
    Abbey Road
    by The Beatles

  15. 15.
    Are You Experienced

  16. 16.
    Blood on the Tracks (Hybr)
    by Bob Dylan

  17. 17.
    Nevermind
    by Nirvana

  18. 18.
    Born to Run
    by Bruce Springsteen

  19. 19.
    Astral Weeks
    by Van Morrison

  20. 20.
    Thriller
    by Michael Jackson

  21. 21.
    The Great Twenty-Eight
    by Chuck Berry

  22. 22.
    Robert Johnson: The Complete Recordings
    by Robert Johnson

  23. 23.
    Plastic Ono Band
    by John Lennon

  24. 24.
    Innervisions
    by Stevie Wonder

  25. 25.
    Live at the Apollo 1962
    by James Brown

  26. 26.
    Rumours
    by Fleetwood Mac

  27. 27.
    The Joshua Tree
    by U2

  28. 28.
    Who's Next
    by The Who

  29. 29.
    Led Zeppelin 1
    by Led Zeppelin

  30. 30.
    Blue
    by Joni Mitchell

  31. 31.
    Bringing It All Back Home
    by Bob Dylan

  32. 32.
    Let It Bleed
    by The Rolling Stones

  33. 33.
    Ramones
    by Ramones

  34. 34.
    Music From Big Pink
    by Band

  35. 35.
    Ziggy Stardust
    by David Bowie

  36. 36.
    Tapestry
    by Carole King

  37. 37.
    Hotel California
    by Eagles

  38. 38.
    Muddy Waters: The Anthology, 1947-1972
    by Muddy Waters

  39. 39.
    Please Please Me (1990)
    by Beatles

  40. 40.
    Forever Changes
    by Love

  41. 41.
    Never Mind The Bollocks, Here's The Sex Pistols
    by Sex Pistols

  42. 42.
    The Doors

  43. 43.
    Dark Side Of The Moon
    by Pink Floyd

  44. 44.
    Horses
    by Patti Smith

  45. 45.
    The Band
    by The Band

  46. 47.
    A Love Supreme
    by John Coltrane

  47. 48.
    It Takes a Nation of Millions
    by Public Enemy

  48. 49.
    At Fillmore East
    by The Allman Brothers Band

  49. 50.
    Here's Little Richard
    by Little Richard

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Created by HumphreyB on May 07, 2006.
 

Comments

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Fixed 1-50 — 2 years ago

I have fixed the first 50 albums to match the RS list again. If they stay like that for some time, I will do the rest.


Messed Up — 2 years ago

Looks like someone decided to edit the list – it no longer matches the list source. This is no longer the Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list.


Let's Return To Reality — 2 years ago

This list, along with almost all lists of the ‘greatest’ albums, is so pathetic that only when you understand the commercial and biased nature of Rolling Stone will you be able to contemplate how such a historically inaccurate list could be published.

First of all, no serious musician contributed to the writing of this list. Of course Rolling Stone recruited some half-wit pop sensation such as Sting or David Bowie to help them with their already predetermined Beatles fetishism (one of the worst and most overrated bands in the history of recorded music), clearly not that they would have needed it.

Secondly, this list has seemingly no appreciation for artists with actual talent. These being artists such as Tim Buckley, The Mothers Of Invention, Captain Beefheart & His Magic Band, Soft Machine, The Velvet Underground, Faust, The Residents, Pere Ubu, Robert Wyatt, Charles Mingus, The Red Krayola, John Coltrane, Henry Cow, Albert Ayler, Morphine etc. The majority of what you’ll find on this list is the same juvinile nonsense as every other list, just in different order. Furthermore, including albums like Captain Beefheart’s ‘Trout Mask Replica’, or the Velvet Underground’s ‘White Light / White Heat’ (two of the greatest albums ever recorded) is actually insulting to them, seeing as how they are denigrated by being ranked under mediocre embarrassments like Nirvana, Elvis Presley, Michael Jackson, The Beach Boys and U2.

Bottom line, this list has nothing other than the vested interests of the music industry in mind.


Seriously? — 3 years ago

i dont know way too much about classic rock and i agree for the most part with the rock albums, but the rap albums on here are way out of order.eminems stuff is way too high, and no tupac?? nwa and beastie boys do not belong where they are either. it should be illmatic, nation of millions, enter wu tang, me against the world, ready to die, low end theory, reasonable doubt, the chronic, and the rest doesnt matter


beatles — 3 years ago

yay love sgt. pepper’s loney heart club band at 1 and revolver. almost all the beatles albums


Update? — 4 years ago

I think Rolling Stone should update this list every year, or at least every five years, like They Shoot Pictures do for their Top 1000 Films list, and IGN do for their Top 100 Video Games list. Both websites have reconsidered each product’s longevity and innovative potential, and have thus made more defined lists.

None of the albums over the past five years have been very innovative at all, so I don’t expect any of them to be added to an updated list. However, I do think updating this list would bring great albums that have withstood the test of time better than others, such as Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon and Led Zeppelin IV up higher on the list, and bring down compilation albums that haven’t had anywhere near the longevity, such as Chuck Berry’s Great Twenty Eight, and The Muddy Waters Anthology. Don’t get me wrong, both Chuck Berry and Muddy Waters are incredible, but it was their songs more than their albums that redefined blues and rock and roll. I believe putting compilation albums higher than well-produced, innovative, and top-selling albums is what’s damaging this list the most, and if Rolling Stone were to fix that problem, I think this list would be much better.


Pathetic — 4 years ago

There are so many things wrong with this list that I can hardly count them all.

First of all, this list presents an extreme bias towards 1960’s rock. No list of the greatest albums of all time should have four albums by the same band in the top ten. Even if they are The Beatles. Bob Dylan is of course also overrepresented.

Nostalgia for failed 1960’s cultural revolution definitely trumps musical ingenuity on this list.

The only album on the top 20 that was published after 1990 is Nirvana’s “Nevermind.” This is really sad. This demonstrates a great ignorance of modern rock music.

And of course, I don’t really understand why someone like Madonna even needs to be on this list, especially when truly great musicians like Frank Zappa are either underrepresented or left off entirely.

Progressive rock is no where to be found on this list. Sure, I’m not mad that there’s no Genesis here, but to completely omit King Crimson’s “Red” and “In the Court of the Crimson King” is just plain stupid, anti-intellectual even. Gentle Giant should be seen SOMEWHERE at least.

Also, the inclusion of Jazz albums is a big mistake. It’s insulting to every Jazz musician included or not included on this list. There is no fair basis of comparison between pop music and Jazz. Stupid.

Ultimately, this list is just a sad mixture between suedo-political rockers of the 60’s and a bunch of feel good pop that some critics probably voted for because they are being paid by record labels.

True political revolutionaries such as Dead Prez are of course left off.

I wish that someone would produce an alternative list that accounts better for the truly great moments of pop music’s history. It’s would have to shorter no doubt. Maybe 100 items. They’re haven’t been that many great moments, really.


Genesis? — 5 years ago

Really, Rolling Stone? No Genesis?


One SONG short of complete!!!!! — 5 years ago

Well, its taken about 3 years and lots of trips to the library but this week I have completed listening to, and collecting ALL the Rolling Stone 500 list…all except for ONE song !!!

(1) Yes, just one song !!! Anyone can probably guess what that one is, because I don’t think it is available on CD in the United States, and is exorbitant to purchase. And that is the Fabulous Ronettes featuring Veronica

I can put together a version using the Best of the Ronettes, but it is missing a few of their songs. I found a copy of Chapel of Love easy enough, but it is the last one I have not been able to find… so I am appealing to the listers to help direct me to where I can get it…

It is the What’d I Say song.

If anyone knows where I can get it, or if you have it and would be willing to send me the file, I would be very grateful!! And of course I would trade you something you need or are looking for…I got everything else covered for ya!

Thanks in advance,

Oodb


Untitled — 5 years ago

Generally thumbs up – better than many lists these days that are desperate to be cool, avoid certain artists like the plague. Good to find some greatest hits collections- why not? Amazing that would-be buffs usually only include studio not compilation albums. Must be part of same must-be-cool problem



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